Boarding house – Center Hostel http://center-hostel.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 02:13:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://center-hostel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T211356.633-150x150.png Boarding house – Center Hostel http://center-hostel.com/ 32 32 Vaccinations encouraged in the face of the start of the flu season https://center-hostel.com/vaccinations-encouraged-in-the-face-of-the-start-of-the-flu-season/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 23:44:59 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/vaccinations-encouraged-in-the-face-of-the-start-of-the-flu-season/ SEATTLE — Doctors are bracing for a tough winter, according to a statement from the Washington State Medical Association. In separate press releases, the Washington Department of Health and the WSMA both advised Washington residents to get their flu shots. The number of respiratory syncytial virus cases is rising sharply, especially among children, the statement […]]]>


SEATTLE — Doctors are bracing for a tough winter, according to a statement from the Washington State Medical Association. In separate press releases, the Washington Department of Health and the WSMA both advised Washington residents to get their flu shots.

The number of respiratory syncytial virus cases is rising sharply, especially among children, the statement said. Flu season has also arrived early this year, the WSMA wrote, and there is also a risk of an increase in COVID-19. Pediatric hospital beds are filling up quickly, the statement said, and sick children are being rushed to emergency rooms.

“Our state’s pediatric health system is overloaded with an extremely high number of children suffering from respiratory infections,” Tao Sheng Kwan-Gett, scientific director of the health department, said in a department press release. . “Families urgently need to do all they can to keep everyone healthy and avoid the need for health care, and flu shots are one of the most important prevention tools.”

The WSMA urges anyone over the age of 6 months to get vaccinated against COVID-19 and influenza, the statement said. People over the age of 5 whose last COVID-19 vaccine was at least two months ago can get the updated booster. Flu and COVID-19 vaccines can be safely given at the same time, the statement said. The flu vaccine takes about two weeks to become effective once administered, according to the Washington Department of Health.

The WSMA also encourages Washingtonians to wash their hands frequently, try not to touch their eyes, nose and mouth, and wear a mask in crowded indoor situations. Since RSV is highly transmissible by touching contaminated surfaces, it is important to frequently disinfect high-touch surfaces in the home, the WSMA wrote.

Children who show moderate symptoms of illness, such as fever, cough, difficulty breathing, congestion, runny nose or sore throat, should not attend school or group activities, the statement said. Adults with symptoms should also stay home and contact their doctor for advice.

The hospital emergency room should only be used for very serious or life-threatening conditions, the WSMA wrote, and not for common illnesses or minor injuries. However, anyone with severe or life-threatening symptoms should call 911 or go to the nearest hospital emergency room.

Additionally, the DOH recommends that everyone wash their hands frequently with soap and water, consider wearing a mask in crowded places, avoid close contact with sick people, sneeze or to cough into the crook of his elbow and to stay home if he feels sick. Additionally, the department said other respiratory diseases like COVID-19 and RSV are also straining the capacity of public hospitals.

This year’s strain is influenza A H3N2, which is covered by this year’s vaccine, the press release said. For more information on where to get a flu shot, visit the Department’s Influenza website at knockoutflu.org.

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Hereafter by Vona Groarke: the poet gives thanks by evoking her emigrant ancestor in life https://center-hostel.com/hereafter-by-vona-groarke-the-poet-gives-thanks-by-evoking-her-emigrant-ancestor-in-life/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/hereafter-by-vona-groarke-the-poet-gives-thanks-by-evoking-her-emigrant-ancestor-in-life/ “She left no trace…but a line,” writes Vona Groarke of her great-grandmother, who emigrated from Co Sligo to New York in 1882. Ellen O’Hara was an evocative presence in the stories that Groarke heard as a child, but decades later, while on a scholarship in New York, the poet struggles to find official evidence of […]]]>

“She left no trace…but a line,” writes Vona Groarke of her great-grandmother, who emigrated from Co Sligo to New York in 1882. Ellen O’Hara was an evocative presence in the stories that Groarke heard as a child, but decades later, while on a scholarship in New York, the poet struggles to find official evidence of Ellen’s difficult life.

his lack of information is both a frustration and a gift. In Hereafter, subsequently, a beautifully distinctive exercise in imaginative empathy, Groarke uses archival material, prose and, most importantly, poetry to ward off his great-grandmother. In doing so, she integrates the problem — the lack of information, the dead ends — into the subject, so that Hereafter, subsequently also becomes a book about the challenges of writing such a book.

Groarke’s quest circuit, his slight reluctance to write about it and Hereafter, subsequentlythe hybrid form of recall A ghost in the throat by poet Doireann Ní Ghríofa – a mix of essays and autofiction documenting Ní Ghríofa’s search for information about the poet Eibhlín Dubh Ní Chonaill. Hereafter, subsequently also has roots in other gender-defying biographies by women such as Suite for Barbara Loden by Nathalie Leger.

Groarke’s writing is intimate – and impeccably polished – but there are few glimpses of his personal life. In a book about untold stories, most of his exist beyond the page. She remains focused on how she feels about her business and the forces that shaped her great-grandmother.

With some evidence and plenty of guesswork, it reconstructs Ellen’s early years in New York as a servant amid rampant anti-Irish bigotry. Included are a caricature of Puck magazine depicting a rude and animalistic Irish housekeeper and a wanted advertisement specifically seeking to employ a “Protestant girl”.

Although not abundant, Ellen left traces – a misspelled name on a census or a ship’s passenger list. In 1901, now a mother of two and probably abandoned by her husband, she brought her children back to Ireland, left them with her parents, and returned to New York. It took 12 years before she saw them again, by which time she was running a boarding house.

Groarke gives voice to Ellen in poems she calls “folk sonnets” and through these her great-grandmother comes across as shrewd, pragmatic, stubborn and infinitely skeptical of her descendant’s investigations: “N isn’t it a lot of time and energy to lavish on a life that isn’t yours?

The strained relationship between the two women is underpinned by the poet’s awareness of the liberties she takes in romanticizing Ellen, and of her own power and privilege, her 21st century freedoms. The sonnets and prose passages dramatize his disquiet, as well as Ellen’s resistance to his “assumptions”.

While these apprehensions are understandable — and the complexity of the writer-character bond precludes sentimentality and creates additional tension and depth — Groarke’s doubts may seem too intrusive. She holds herself to extremely high ethical standards, never really making peace with her project, wondering if it’s “vanity” to want to imagine a particular scene, a “narcissistic impulse” or “somehow helpful”. what if there’s “a way to make it be both?”

In fact, his impulses are more than helpful, contributing as they do to an important piece of Irish social history. From the mid-19th century, Ellen and her peers – “Irish women in aprons” – sent home money that helped their families pay rent and bills, buy land and property . In the early 1900s, Irish women in the United States tended to stay single longer than their male counterparts, often working as servants, which meant they could live in their employers’ homes and save their earnings.

“Dollar by dollar, pound by pound”, writes Groarke, “these women helped build modern Ireland”.

Hereafter, subsequentlyThinness belies its field; its bibliography is abundant, its contemporary resonance important. Groarke is sensitive to the power of space as she explores economic inequality, the impact of emigration, intergenerational trauma, and ambivalent ideas of home. The white space on the page reflects the space it allows its readers to make their own connections and emotionally engage with what is a deeply sad story as well as a story of resilience.

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It is a necessarily fragmented narrative. A revelation at the end sheds new light on the importance of Ellen and the book to Groarke and shows how trauma ripples through generations, perpetuating cycles of pain. The revelation also comes as a shock, a visceral jolt heightened by the fact that Ellen, Groarke’s often “bare-cheeked top dudgeon” has become so believable, so audible, so endearing.

At the end of the thanks, Groarke thanks his great-grandmother and “all the Ellens. Because they truly deserve to be thanked,” she wrote, “even after so many years.”

Hereafter, thereafter is an appropriate expression of gratitude, a claim or rectification as well as an attempt to collect and understand Ellen’s life.

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Below by Vona Groarke

Fiction: Beyond Vona Groarke
NYU Press, 224 pages, hardcover €27.81; e-book €18.04

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Mozambique: Journalist Arlindo Chissale faces lesser charge after terrorism charge https://center-hostel.com/mozambique-journalist-arlindo-chissale-faces-lesser-charge-after-terrorism-charge/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 05:22:31 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/mozambique-journalist-arlindo-chissale-faces-lesser-charge-after-terrorism-charge/ At 4 a.m. on October 29, Arlindo Chissale, editor of the private newspaper Pinnacle News, which specializes in reporting on the insurgency in Cabo Delgado province, was arrested by police in Balama, west of the provincial capital of Pemba, and held in police cells. for six days, according to news reports from the Mozambican chapter […]]]>

At 4 a.m. on October 29, Arlindo Chissale, editor of the private newspaper Pinnacle News, which specializes in reporting on the insurgency in Cabo Delgado province, was arrested by police in Balama, west of the provincial capital of Pemba, and held in police cells. for six days, according to news reports from the Mozambican chapter of the regional media freedom group, the Media Institute of Southern Africa (MISA), and the journalist who spoke to CPJ by phone.

Chissale was denied access to a lawyer and his family for the first four days of his detention and his two phones were confiscated and searched, according to the journalist, who said he was in Balama to organize a accommodation ahead of next year’s municipal elections for Renamo, the opposition party for which he sometimes works and plans to stand as a candidate in municipal elections. Chissale also took photos, reported and published articles for Pinnacle News in Cabo Delgado.

After public outcry, including fears of Chissale’s enforced disappearance, Gilroy Fazenda, spokesman for the Cabo Delgado prosecutor’s office, charged Chissale on Nov. 3 with alleged terrorism and gathering information for terrorist purposes, crimes punishable by sentence of up to 20 years in prison, according to audio of a press conference reviewed by CPJ. Fazenda added that Chissale had identified himself as a journalist using an expired credential and that officers were not sure he was one.

That evening, a Balama District Court judge ordered Chissale’s interim release after finding there were not strong enough grounds to keep him in custody and said the journalist should answer to a lesser charge under Section 344 (3) of the Penal Code. code that prohibits professionals, including journalists, from working without a proper license or accreditation, according to lawyer Augusto Messariamba, another MISA statement and the media. Messariamba told CPJ that Chissale was released on November 4, after providing proof of his identity and residence.

In an interview with Deutsche Welle after his release, Chissale said he had traveled to Balama ahead of next year’s municipal elections and hoped to help Renamo. He said the police reacted as they did because he was a supporter of an opposition party “and even more so being a journalist”.

He said in the interview that after his arrest, the police went to his boarding house to check his credentials as a journalist. “They didn’t like the presence of the journalist” and the mention of Renamo, he said.

Balama’s government administrator, Edson Lima, told CPJ via the messaging app that he learned of the journalist’s detention after Fazenda’s statement and that Chissale’s “was an isolated case because Balama is a safe place for journalists”.