Dormitory – Center Hostel http://center-hostel.com/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 09:04:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://center-hostel.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/icon-2021-08-02T211356.633-150x150.png Dormitory – Center Hostel http://center-hostel.com/ 32 32 New Chinese play celebrates rural teacher’s achievements https://center-hostel.com/new-chinese-play-celebrates-rural-teachers-achievements/ Fri, 05 Aug 2022 09:04:16 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/new-chinese-play-celebrates-rural-teachers-achievements/ chinese game, Professor Guimeifrom the Yunnan Drama Theater, will debut in Beijing on August 9. [Photo provided to China Daily] Zhang Guimei’s story is well known throughout China. About two decades ago, Zhang encountered a teenage girl sitting in a daze on the side of a road in Huaping County, Yunnan Province. Zhang, a local […]]]>

chinese game,
Professor Guimeifrom the Yunnan Drama Theater, will debut in Beijing on August 9. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Zhang Guimei’s story is well known throughout China.

About two decades ago, Zhang encountered a teenage girl sitting in a daze on the side of a road in Huaping County, Yunnan Province. Zhang, a local high school teacher, asked her what was wrong. The girl told Zhang that she wanted to go to school, but her family was too poor to afford it.

Zhang went to the 14-year-old girl’s home, hoping to persuade her parents to allow their daughter to continue her education. However, Zhang’s parents refused. With the little girl lingering in her mind, Zhang tried to figure out how to help local girls who can’t pay their school fees because their parents usually save money for their sons instead.

In 2007, Zhang was elected as the representative of the 17th National Congress of the Communist Party of China and attended the meeting in Beijing. A report on Zhang helped her ambition to build an all-girls school catch the attention of Huaping County officials and other supporters. A year later, Huaping Girls’ High School, China’s first tuition-free high school, opened and enrolled 100 students, with Zhang as president. Most of the girls came from mountainous regions. Many had physical disabilities or were orphans or children of single parents.

Award-winning actress Li Hongmei in the lead role of the play. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Zhang’s story was adapted into a Chinese play, titled Professor Guimei, from the Yunnan Drama Theater, which launched a nationwide tour visiting eight cities with 11 performances. On August 9, the play will make its debut at the Poly Theater in Beijing.

Directed by Wang Baoshe, who is also the playwright; and Chang Hao, the Chinese play premiered in Kunming, Yunnan Province in June 2021, starring award-winning actress Li Hongmei in the lead role.

According to Chang, right after preparations for the play began, members of the creative team visited Zhang frequently and did interviews with her, trying to keep the script true to its story.

Zhang was born in 1957 in Heilongjiang province in northeastern China. After graduating from Lijiang Normal School, Zhang moved with her husband to Dali, Yunnan Province, where they were both teachers.

Based on the true stories of Zhang Guimei, the Chinese play toured nationwide earlier this year. [Photo provided to China Daily]

Following her husband’s death in 1996, Zhang moved to Huaping, where she taught at a school during the day and ran a children’s home in her spare time.

Zhang has donated more than one million yuan ($148,200) to the school over the past three decades, having meager savings for herself. She lived in the school dormitory with the girls.

Following in Zhang’s footsteps, many graduates of Huaping Girls’ High School chose to work in remote areas.

In July 2021, she was one of the recipients of that year’s July 1 Medal, the highest honor given to a member of the Chinese Communist Party, for outstanding contributions to education in the mountainous region.

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Federal judge strikes down Texas election law requiring residency verification of voter registration addresses https://center-hostel.com/federal-judge-strikes-down-texas-election-law-requiring-residency-verification-of-voter-registration-addresses/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 17:35:50 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/federal-judge-strikes-down-texas-election-law-requiring-residency-verification-of-voter-registration-addresses/ Austin, TX, 23 seconds ago — U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel struck a Texas election law requiring county registrars to verify the addresses of registered voters in their jurisdiction. The law in question Senate Bill (SB) 1111, requires county voter registration offices to verify that addresses at which voters are registered match residences, not just […]]]>
U.S. District Judge Lee Yeakel struck a Texas election law requiring county registrars to verify the addresses of registered voters in their jurisdiction.

The law in question Senate Bill (SB) 1111, requires county voter registration offices to verify that addresses at which voters are registered match residences, not just PO boxes or other types of addresses. Previously, the Electoral Code instructed the registrar to carry out a verification only if he had “reason to believe that the current residence of a voter is different from that indicated on the registers of registration”.

If a registrar has reason to believe that the registration address is not a residence, they are responsible for notifying the voter and requesting verification such as a driver’s license, ID issued by the state, transportation license, county district assessment document showing ownership status, utility bill, or official tax or motor vehicle document confirming address.

Under state code, PO boxes can be used as mailing addresses listed in voter records, but not as physical addresses listed.

In his Declaration of Intent for SB 1111, State Senator Paul Bettencourt (R-Houston) wrote, “Currently, the Texas Election Code does not sufficiently define the characteristics of a voter’s residential address.”

“Consequently, the vague description of a residential address allowed voter registration certificates with residential addresses corresponding to vacant lots, mailbox stores, motels, and commercial locations.”

The plaintiffs — the Texas League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) and Voto Latino — alleged that three provisions of the bill “constitute an unconstitutional charge to the right to vote.”

The first is the section that requires voters whose registration address is a post office box to submit “proof of the voter’s residential address” to the Registrar. The second states that “a person may not establish his residence for the purpose of influencing the outcome of a certain election”, called the “residency provision”. And the third states that a registered address is not lost if the voter leaves for “temporary purposes only”.

Judge Yeakel ruled that the first provision in question is justified except in the case where the voter would no longer claim to live at the address of the postal box; the second is not “narrow” and therefore “fails any degree of constitutional review”; and the temporary relocation provision fails to “pass constitutional scrutiny” on the grounds that it does not exempt students who are transient between school and home.

On the last point, the judge wrote, “that a person cannot designate a residence ‘unless the person inhabits the place at the time of the designation and intends to remain there'”.

Regarding full-time students, the law states: “[A] voter registered as a full-time student who lives on the campus of an institution of higher learning can use the address of a post office box located on the campus of the institution or in a dormitory owned or operated by the establishment to confirm the identity of the voter’s residence.”

Senator Bettencourt, the author of the bill, said The Texan“This is a disappointing decision as it goes against common sense electoral practices.”

“The law just requires you to register where you live, and without that we will have people registering to vote on the head of a pin. People can’t live in PO boxes.

According to Bettencourt, as many as 8,000 voters registered at Harris County mailboxes.

“We are delighted that the court recognized what we knew all along: that SB 1111 is unconstitutional and must be struck down,” said María Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino. “The real purpose of this discriminatory measure has always been to suppress voter turnout – especially among young people, communities of color, low-income voters and other historically marginalized groups.”

The attorney general’s office is likely to appeal, but it had to make a procedural move to secure that ability.

LULAC’s original lawsuit did not name the state as a defendant but voter records in six strongly Democratic counties: Bexar, Dallas, El Paso, Harris, Hidalgo and Travis.

Therefore, to secure the right of appeal, the State of Texas had to intervene in the lawsuit – a petition from an interested party that seeks to show a personal interest in the outcome of the case.

Four of the six defendant court clerks refused to rule on either LULAC’s claims or the attorney general’s motion to intervene. A single registration office, Yvonne Ramón of Hidalgo Countyopposed the plaintiff’s motion, on the ground that it merely followed state law passed by the legislature which should therefore be the star defendant.

The sixth clerk, Lisa Wise from El Paso Countyon the plaintiffs’ side, arguing that the “lack of clarity in the residency provision has a real impact on voters’ ability to register and vote”.

If appealed by the state, the next stage of the trial is the US Fifth Circuit.

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Shawnee County will solicit bids to purchase beds for its jail and correctional annex https://center-hostel.com/shawnee-county-will-solicit-bids-to-purchase-beds-for-its-jail-and-correctional-annex/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/shawnee-county-will-solicit-bids-to-purchase-beds-for-its-jail-and-correctional-annex/ Shawnee County Jail’s population has never been higher in its 35-year history. The county will now seek bids to buy more beds to help deal with that. County Commissioners Aaron Mays and Kevin Cook voted 2-0 on Monday, with Commissioner Bill Riphahn absent, to allow Director of Corrections Brian Cole to solicit bids to buy […]]]>

Shawnee County Jail’s population has never been higher in its 35-year history.

The county will now seek bids to buy more beds to help deal with that.

County Commissioners Aaron Mays and Kevin Cook voted 2-0 on Monday, with Commissioner Bill Riphahn absent, to allow Director of Corrections Brian Cole to solicit bids to buy 40 bunk beds and about five single beds.

The move will allow the prison to house its inmates in a “better and more secure” way, Cole said.

The cost is estimated at $100,000 over the next two years, with the corrections department planning to pay for it with money from its 2022 budget, Cole told commissioners.

The ‘great catch-up’ in court cases is one of the reasons the prison population has increased

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2nd-year running back Najee Harris adds leadership role in Steelers offense https://center-hostel.com/2nd-year-running-back-najee-harris-adds-leadership-role-in-steelers-offense/ Sat, 30 Jul 2022 15:23:55 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/2nd-year-running-back-najee-harris-adds-leadership-role-in-steelers-offense/ For a player who as a rookie led the NFL in touches, played nearly 1,000 offensive snaps, and was the designated ball carrier or target for nearly 40% of his team’s plays, it may seem hard for the Pittsburgh Steelers to ask much more of Najee. Harris in 2nd grade. That doesn’t mean the head […]]]>

For a player who as a rookie led the NFL in touches, played nearly 1,000 offensive snaps, and was the designated ball carrier or target for nearly 40% of his team’s plays, it may seem hard for the Pittsburgh Steelers to ask much more of Najee. Harris in 2nd grade.

That doesn’t mean the head coach and team captain haven’t done it though.

“(Mike Tomlin) and Cam (Heyward), they brought me in and talked about playing a leadership role,” Harris said during his training camp report in Saint Vincent last week.

“They said to me, ‘You have to be that guy.'”

So Harris, the sophomore running back who was a first-round pick after helping Alabama win another national title, adds a big task to the heavy workload he’s already been asked to carry. wear for the Steelers at just 24 years old.

A leadership voice for a young Steelers offense.

“I don’t ask people to be something they’re not,” Tomlin said. “It is naturally in its wheelhouse. It’s something that just oozes out of him. It’s just about him and us cultivating that and using it for our collective good.

The only running back caught in the first round last year, Harris then led the NFL in rookie running backs (307), rushing yards (1,200), scrimmage yards (1,667), touchdowns rushing (seven) and total touchdowns (10). He was second all-league in touches (381), led all league running backs in strikes (74) and targets (94, tied), and finished third among all running backs for receiving yards (467).

Never hesitating to take on that massive workload, Harris also insists he’s ready to take on more of the intangible that comes with being a budding league star.

“I accept it,” he said of being a team leader.

But by what methods? Harris is somewhat of a dichotomy in that he is far from shy but at the same time can be reluctant to be the center of attention. He is an outgoing and quick-witted prankster while hesitant to speak on behalf of the team.

“There are all types of leaders – there are leaders leading from the back and there are leaders leading up front,” Harris explained. “Obviously the vocals love Cam, and there are leaders who lead by example. I feel like the kind of guy who leads by example. I try to be that kind of person But I also try to be the one who leads when talking.

“There are all kinds of leaders. It’s really who the team is most comfortable with, who can set the best example of what the norm is. For me, it’s just playing by the norm.

The standard.

Harris spent four years immersed in what is the gold standard of college programs at Alabama, and like anyone who has been in the Steelers stadium locker room, he quickly became familiar with Tomlin’s credo, “The standard is standard.” It is embossed in chrome in what is now called Acrisure Stadium.

So, for Harris, what is “The Standard?”

“The Steelers standard, obviously, is tough football,” he said as he stood outside the Rooney Hall dormitory he’ll call home for more than three weeks in Unity Township. “It’s gritty, like those damn dorm rooms, stuff like that, just traditional Steelers style.

“Mine goes that way too. But I’m motivated in a way, I want to do more. Mine is more of a hunger and motivation for me.

A curious guy eager to read and learn about a new topic that interests him, Harris seems genuinely intrigued by learning leadership methods. Much like perhaps when, say, coaches at Alabama asked him to work on his receiving game or as a rookie, the Steelers coaching staff implored Harris to hone his skills in pass protection, now that Harris has been tasked with providing the leadership he expects. to attack it with the same enthusiasm.

“Naj is a good football player, and he’s going to get better,” retired Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger said in a recent interview with WDVE. “He will probably carry the load this year and he is capable of doing it. I think he has the ability to be a great leader for this offense.

The truth is, according to some of his veteran teammates, Harris had already achieved leadership stature by the end of his rookie season. Forced to be calmer in his first round of pros at the end of 2021, Harris’ work ethic and production had earned the respect of his teammates.

“You could see it was a natural progression last year,” Heyward said. “Najee was asking for more, eager to lead and be heard. Najee is a guy who leads by example and is always active and knows how to be in the weight room trying to improve. Guys should follow his example.

Hey, Steelers Nation, get the latest Pittsburgh Steelers news here.

Chris Adamski is an editor at Tribune-Review. You can contact Chris by email at cadamski@triblive.com or via Twitter .

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Memorial service held in Japan for the disabled 6 years after the massacre https://center-hostel.com/memorial-service-held-in-japan-for-the-disabled-6-years-after-the-massacre/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 08:02:54 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/memorial-service-held-in-japan-for-the-disabled-6-years-after-the-massacre/ This photo shows bouquets of flowers offered at a cenotaph at the Tsukui Yamayuri En care center in Sagamihara, Kanagawa Prefecture on July 26, 2022, six years after the fatal stabbings. (Mainichi/Natsuki Nishi) SAGAMIHARA, Kanagawa – A memorial service commemorating the victims of a stabbing rampage that left […]]]>






This photo shows bouquets of flowers offered at a cenotaph at the Tsukui Yamayuri En care center in Sagamihara, Kanagawa Prefecture on July 26, 2022, six years after the fatal stabbings. (Mainichi/Natsuki Nishi)

SAGAMIHARA, Kanagawa – A memorial service commemorating the victims of a stabbing rampage that left 19 dead and 26 injured at a disability care facility in this eastern Japanese city was held on July 26 , the sixth anniversary of the incident.

The ceremony, organized by the Kanagawa prefectural government and other agencies, was the first such event to be held on the same day as the incident. The bereaved families and others observed a minute of silence for the 19 residents who lost their lives at the Tsukui Yamayuri En facility.

In addition to the bereaved family members, the memorial service, which began at 10:30 a.m., was attended by members of the facility residents’ family association and officials from the Kanagawa Kyodo-kai welfare organization, who manages the establishment. Due to a COIVD cluster in a dormitory at the site, residents were not allowed to participate.

Kanagawa Governor Yuji Kuroiwa addressed the attendees at the ceremony, saying, “Even now, I can’t help but feel strong resentment and deep sadness. of social services integrating the point of view of the parties concerned is the norm.”

The facility was rebuilt after the 2016 incident, and it was the second year that a memorial service was held at the site. Previous memorial services were held on a different date in late July.

The names of seven of the victims are engraved on a cenotaph installed in the establishment, with the consent of their families. The prefectural government asked the media to refrain from releasing the names, as some of the bereaved families did not want the names of their loved ones widely published in the media.

(Japanese original by Satoru Suzuki, Yokohama Office)

]]> Solving New York’s Affordable Housing Crisis, Even During a Pandemic https://center-hostel.com/solving-new-yorks-affordable-housing-crisis-even-during-a-pandemic/ Sun, 24 Jul 2022 17:51:00 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/solving-new-yorks-affordable-housing-crisis-even-during-a-pandemic/ When New York City went into lockdown in the spring of 2020, many human service nonprofits had to find new ways to serve those in need, and Project Renewal was one of them. The 55-year-old nonprofit aims to end the cycle of homelessness and recently opened Bedford Green House, a 117-apartment building in the Bronx […]]]>

When New York City went into lockdown in the spring of 2020, many human service nonprofits had to find new ways to serve those in need, and Project Renewal was one of them. The 55-year-old nonprofit aims to end the cycle of homelessness and recently opened Bedford Green House, a 117-apartment building in the Bronx that includes an aquaponics farm, library and community medical clinic. It’s a project the nonprofit had in the works during the lockdown, and as its CEO Eric Rosenbaum tells New York Nonprofit Media, there are more to come.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

What is the mission of Project Renewal?

Project Renewal’s mission is to break the cycle of homelessness by enabling individuals and families to renew their lives with health homes. And what that means in practice is that we provide a full range of housing, from shelter and transitional housing, which lasts around three to five years, to supported and affordable permanent housing, at around 1000 people per night. in shelter and housing with a purpose, particularly on single adults with a history of mental illness, substance use disorders, and incarceration. And then we bring wraparound services into that housing environment that include a full spectrum of health care including primary care, psychiatry, addiction treatment, etc., and workforce development programs. work that helps people, many of whom may have no work experience. and very little education, learn both the life skills that prepare people for work, as well as the job skills that enable them to obtain jobs with the potential for long-term career advancement.

You opened one of New York’s first support and connection centers. How did it go for your organization?

We were very happy to be one of two non-profit organizations that were selected to do this, [and be the] first in town. The model comes from other settings where it is called a diversion center. Diversion is when the police encounter someone on the street who is behaving erratically, who might be under the influence of substances or alcohol, who might be behaving a bit aggressively. The police generally respond with a criminal justice and preventive approach. [approach], since that is what they are trained to do. So instead of taking that person to the police station or doing what a normal criminal justice response would be, the Support and Connection Center is a place where they can be taken to instead. And they are greeted by a peer with lived experience, who can establish a rapport immediately. They are offered a visit by a nurse to check their state of health, they are offered a meal, a shower, a bed, and they can stay for up to five days and sometimes a little longer. And during this time, we strive to connect them with whatever services they need, so they can break the cycle that for many of these people is a turning cycle. [door] system that goes from a street to a psychiatric hospital, to go to a shelter, to prison, then back to the street. The goal is to interrupt this cycle. One of the ways we do this is that while people can stay with us for five days or more initially, once they’ve been with us they can come back under what looks like an open door policy. whenever they want support. This allowed us to help them break this [aforementioned] cycle, which is not very useful and often very expensive, and [we] bring people more on the path to permanence and independence.

How was it for Project Renewal during the pandemic?

The first and most immediate impact was the recognition of deep inequity. In so many systems, it really struck us. First, we looked at our own employees, because at the very beginning of the pandemic, when there was very little information, there was very little access to masks or PPE. And of course, there was no vaccine or test. These are our frontline workers who still had to come to work every day, who had to take public transport whether it was working or not, and who had to expose themselves to the virus, even at a time when their families and communities were being very disproportionately affected by COVID. And it was obvious to us how unfair it was that we were asking our front-line workers, who are among our lowest-paid employees, to take these kinds of risks when other employees, those in positions more administrative and often earn higher salaries, were able to be effective in their work in a more protected environment [by] work abroad. We are therefore committed to trying to solve this problem in any way possible. And in particular, we have done this by increasing paid leave so that people have more access to leave; offering hazard pay and other bonuses or pay increases to at least recognize the inequity and take steps to address it. Another big impact was related to race, as these frontline workers are very disproportionately black and brown. In the first summer of the pandemic, the murder of George Floyd really, really accelerated our understanding of these issues and how they added disproportionately to the impacts that the pandemic itself had had on these communities.

When New York imposed a curfew and the subways were shut down overnight, we were still operating 24/7. Our staff still had to come to work and the hurdles to get there were even greater. . Sometimes our staff members were challenged to be on the streets when all they were trying to do was get to work. When New York City moved 10,000 people from mass shelters to hotels, our workforce was once again challenged because neighborhoods were furious that former luxury hotels were being taken over by homeless and new to these neighborhoods. We operated the Hotel Lucerne, which was in the news for months, and then our employees took the brunt of the neighborhood anger over the placement of our guests in that hotel. So it added more and more insults to our workforce. And it was hard on the client. However, being in a hotel environment has actually taught us a big and important beneficial lesson: having access to a safe and private physical environment, where a person is more in control of what is happening around them, reduces anxiety. It had a really positive impact, reducing the number of drug overdoses we were reversing, or reported substance use. This reinforced for us the need to try to ensure that the shelter is as safe as possible and that we all provide as much privacy as possible to people we have seen in the hotel environment how beneficial it was.

What has Project Renewal been up to over the past few months?

We had a lot of projects in our pipeline, slowly simmering, half in the background. But we were expanding our portfolio and one of the things we were advocating for very strongly during the pandemic was the conversion of hotels into permanent accommodation. We saw that these hotels were unlikely to return as hotels, were likely to remain closed, or were in financial difficulty because they could not service their debt. Since homelessness fundamentally results from the lack of deeply affordable housing, we saw early on the opportunity to turn some of these hotels into housing in a way that could really dramatically reduce homelessness. So we worked on one of the first hotel conversion projects during the pandemic. Unfortunately, this conversion was killed by the previous administration just weeks before we were due to complete the acquisition and begin the conversion.

But we had other projects in our pipeline. We [recently] took the ribbon cutting for Bedford Green House, which is a 117-unit LEED Gold-certified apartment exclusively for people who have been homeless or low-income in the Bronx with an amazing rooftop greenhouse where residents can grow their own vegetables and fish in a self-contained ecosystem. This is the kind of community building we want to do for people, not only to give them the key to an apartment, but also to help them be part of a larger community that can help support them.

And after?

We will be inaugurating other projects this fall, including part of the redevelopment of the Greenpoint hospital. We will be renovating a former nurses dormitory and homeless shelter to replace an existing shelter on this site. We are going to open the second phase of Bedford Green, which is literally on the land directly behind the first, where we will add another 116 apartments. During this time, the city passed us the deed to a shelter we operate in East Midtown Manhattan, so that we can redevelop this site into a brand new tower that will have 130 affordable apartments for people with low income, one of the few opportunities to do this in East Midtown, with a brand new shelter to replace the existing one and a street-facing health care center that will provide primary care, not only to residents of the building , but to people in the immediate vicinity. And as always, in all of our healthcare facilities, regardless of ability to pay. Our healthcare is accessible to everyone.

What are your hopes for the future of Project Renewal?

We will increase our footprint and the number of people we are able to serve by approximately 50% over the next few years, so we are building organizational capacity to ensure we are resilient and compensate our team.

I’m incredibly excited about the future of Project Renewal. I would like us to be a leader in the development of affordable and supportive housing for the very low income, because it is the solution to homelessness for New York City. We cannot effectively address homelessness until we create housing faster than we are increasing homelessness. [Also] during the first week of the pandemic, we immediately switched to telehealth. About half of our clinical staff were quarantined or sick themselves, but they carried on as they could continue to provide services. So clinical care didn’t suffer and it became a big thing for us.

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In Siversk, Ukraine, a grave dug on a sidewalk https://center-hostel.com/in-siversk-ukraine-a-grave-dug-on-a-sidewalk/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 01:35:07 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/in-siversk-ukraine-a-grave-dug-on-a-sidewalk/ Oleksy’s grave was hastily dug, on the sidewalk near one of the few buildings still standing in Siversk. Photo: Anatolii Stepanov / AFPSource: AFP New feature: Find out the news exactly for you ➡️ find the “Recommended for you” block and enjoy! Oleksy’s grave was hastily dug on the sidewalk near one of the few […]]]>
Oleksy’s grave was hastily dug, on the sidewalk near one of the few buildings still standing in Siversk. Photo: Anatolii Stepanov / AFP
Source: AFP

New feature: Find out the news exactly for you ➡ find the “Recommended for you” block and enjoy!

Oleksy’s grave was hastily dug on the sidewalk near one of the few buildings still standing in Siversk, a small town in eastern Ukraine near the frontline of the war with Russia .

The 46-year-old died in a missile strike on June 30, one of many victims of Russia’s February invasion of pro-Western Ukraine.

His final resting place outside the Siversk Cultural Center is just a small mound of dirt, topped with two concrete slabs – part of a nearby fence – that serve as a tombstone.

“Rest in peace brother. We love you, we remember you, we mourn you,” reads a cardboard sign near the makeshift grave.

A small bouquet of yellow flowers has been placed on top.

“What can I tell you? He was sitting in front of his house, there were two missiles and he was killed instantly,” says Valéry, a 56-year-old neighbor.

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The town of around 10,000 before the war has been shelled relentlessly for weeks by Russian forces
The town of around 10,000 before the war was shelled relentlessly for weeks by Russian forces. Photo: Anatolii Stepanov / AFP
Source: AFP

But he has no time to share more information. In Siversk, it is dangerous to linger too long in one place.

Siversk lives and breathes fear. The town of around 10,000 before the war was shelled relentlessly for weeks by nearby Russian forces.

Its streets are riddled with huge craters, its buildings scorched by fire. Outside, stray cats and dogs play near the remains of rockets embedded in the sidewalks.

Visible through the windows of the first floor of the heavily damaged buildings, vestiges of an abandoned life: chests of drawers, family photos, overturned armchairs.

“I can’t leave her”

But despite the imminent danger, some people are on the streets, walking or riding their bikes, with the facial expressions of those beyond fear.

“I would like to leave, of course, but I have a 90-year-old mother, who told me she would die here. I cannot leave her,” says Oleksandr, a man in his 60s .

Read also

Five months later, anger and despair reign in the Donbass

Others do not have the means to flee the incessant bombardments.

The streets of Siversk are riddled with huge craters.  Outside, stray cats and dogs play near rocket remains
The streets of Siversk are riddled with huge craters. Outside, stray cats and dogs play near the rocket remains. Photo: Anatolii Stepanov / AFP
Source: AFP

“We have our home here, it’s our life’s work. And we don’t have the money to leave,” says Anzhela, 50, who like most people preferred to give only her first name. .

At the entrance to the underground cellars where the last civilians of the city take refuge, gas heaters are used to cook food.

But others have evacuated or are in the process of doing so as fighting for eastern Ukraine intensifies. A family drives by with a trailer carrying a refrigerator and a bicycle.

A torn Ukrainian flag flies over what remains of a building blackened by flames, likely a dormitory for workers.

And in front of a house almost reduced to ashes, lies an empty wooden coffin.

It seems that no one had time to use it for the intended purpose.

New Feature: Find out the news exactly for you ➡ find the “Recommended for you” block and enjoy!

Source: AFP

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Japanese Language School Finally Holds 1st Entrance Ceremony After COVID Delays https://center-hostel.com/japanese-language-school-finally-holds-1st-entrance-ceremony-after-covid-delays/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 22:00:45 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/japanese-language-school-finally-holds-1st-entrance-ceremony-after-covid-delays/ A 25-year-old Sri Lankan student, right, speaks in front of other first-year students during the first entrance ceremony at the Japanese International School of Nara in Yamatotakada city, Nara prefecture on July 18 2022. (Mainichi/Shinichi Hamana) YAMATOTAKADA, Nara — The Japanese International School of Nara, which was established […]]]>






A 25-year-old Sri Lankan student, right, speaks in front of other first-year students during the first entrance ceremony at the Japanese International School of Nara in Yamatotakada city, Nara prefecture on July 18 2022. (Mainichi/Shinichi Hamana)

YAMATOTAKADA, Nara — The Japanese International School of Nara, which was established in this western Japanese city in 2020 but had to be closed due to coronavirus-related border restrictions, held its first entrance ceremony on July 18.

The ceremony was attended by 48 freshmen who came to Japan around May after the easing of limited entries to Japan. The school is operated by the public benefit association Nara International Exchange Center in Kashihara, Nara Prefecture. President Hiromi Yoshida told the students, “I would like you to become a bridge between your home country and Japan.

In addition to international exchange activities, the center has been running Japanese language courses in Kashihara for foreigners living in Japan since 1990, but it established the school and obtained approval from the Ministry of Justice to provide a higher level of education. teaching the Japanese language.

The 55 first-year students range in age from 18 to 27, and 40 of them are from Nepal, eight from Sri Lanka, six from Kyrgyzstan and one from Indonesia. Students will enroll in the 18-month or two-year course to take Japanese lessons. The school has prepared a dormitory and will offer students part-time jobs permitted by law.

Regarding their career path after graduation, some students plan to enter a university in Japan, while others plan to return to their home countries and teach there. Japanese.

A 25-year-old from Sri Lanka, who wants to get a hotel job in Japan in the future, spoke on behalf of other freshmen at the entrance ceremony, saying, “I want to study hard every day and interact with Japanese friends, and experience Japanese culture. Let’s do our best in this school to achieve our dreams.”

(Japanese original by Shinichi Hamana, Yamatotakada Residents’ Bureau)

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OKLAHOMA WATCH: Native American residential school listening sessions begin at Anadarko | New https://center-hostel.com/oklahoma-watch-native-american-residential-school-listening-sessions-begin-at-anadarko-new/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/oklahoma-watch-native-american-residential-school-listening-sessions-begin-at-anadarko-new/ Interior Secretary Deb Haaland visited the Riverside Indian School in Anadarko on Saturday, the first stop on a tour of listening sessions to document the testimonies of residential school survivors. Beginning in the late 1800s, many Native American students were sent to federally run boarding schools, removing them from the influence of their tribes. Schools […]]]>

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland visited the Riverside Indian School in Anadarko on Saturday, the first stop on a tour of listening sessions to document the testimonies of residential school survivors.

Beginning in the late 1800s, many Native American students were sent to federally run boarding schools, removing them from the influence of their tribes.

Schools were mechanisms for forced assimilation – children had their long braids cut off and punished for using Indigenous names and speaking Indigenous languages. Children were abused, forced to do manual labor and many died. Burial sites have been discovered in more than 50 schools.

The federal boarding school system included 408 schools in 37 states and territories between 1819 and 1969, according to a report released this spring. Present-day Oklahoma had the largest concentration of these schools at 76.

Why did Haaland come to Anadarko?

In May, the Department of the Interior, a federal agency responsible for conserving public lands and managing relations with tribal nations, released a report on its first phase of investigation into boarding schools and set out four goals. for the Federal Indian Boarding School. Initiative:

• Identify facilities and sites of federally supported boarding schools.

• Identify the names and tribal identities of Native American children who were interned in schools.

• Identify the locations of marked and unmarked burial sites, which are on or near campuses and contain the remains of children who died in schools.

• Incorporate into detailed reports the experiences of survivors and descendants whose lives, families and communities have been affected by the schools.

Haaland also announced the start of a year-long listening tour called The Road to Healing, during which she and Deputy Secretary of Indian Affairs Bryan Newland will travel across the country and create an oral history based on the testimonials from survivors of residential schools.

Oklahoma was the first leg of the tour. Haaland will also travel to Hawaii, Michigan, Arizona and South Dakota in 2022, with additional stops to be announced for 2023.

“Boarding school policies have affected every Indigenous person I know,” Haaland said during the listening session. “Some are survivors, some are descendants, but we all carry the trauma in our hearts. My ancestors endured the horrors of Indian boarding school assimilation policies carried out by the same department that I now head. first time in history that a cabinet secretary has come to the table with this shared trauma, and I haven’t lost it.

What are they trying to accomplish with the listening tour?

After the discovery of 215 unmarked graves at the Kamloops Indian Residential School in Canada, Haaland announced that the United States would review its own federal residential school system, according to a press release from the Department of the Interior.

Congress established the Truth and Healing Commission on Indian Boarding School Policies in September 2021 and tasked it with exploring the impacts of Native American boarding schools. The commission was also asked to provide recommendations on ways to protect unmarked graves, identify the tribal nations from which children were taken, and end the removal of Native American children from their families and tribes by the services. social workers, foster care agencies and adoption agencies. .

Who was there?

About 300 residential school survivors and community members gathered in the gymnasium at the Riverside Indian School. Audience members included Kiowa Tribe Chairman Lawrence Spottedbird, Shawnee Tribe Chief Ben Barnes, Prairie Band Potawatomi Nation Chairman Joseph Rupnick and Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby.

Journalists were allowed to observe the listening session for one hour; seven survivors shared their experiences at boarding schools across the country. Then, a private session without media presence followed.

Younger generations have shared positive experiences with Oklahoma Watch. Angel Elizarraras, 17, a member of the Wichita and affiliated tribes, new senior council president and a student of Riverside for two years, said the school brought her closer to her roots by teaching her songs, dances and the language of his tribe.

“This is my seventh year at Riverside and it really is a great school,” Elizarraras said. “It’s where complete strangers end up becoming family, and all the teachers and staff, they’re amazing, they treat you like you’re their child.”

What is the state of Native American boarding schools now?

Most schools nationwide closed in the 1990s, but the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Education continues to operate four off-reserve boarding schools in Oklahoma, California, Oregon and South Dakota . Riverside at Anadarko is the nation’s oldest federal school. According to its website, the school boards have nearly 800 students from more than 75 Native American tribes across the country and have taught with a renewed emphasis on tribal self-determination and sovereignty since 1975.

Other active, tribally operated but federally funded schools in Oklahoma include Chickasaw Children’s Village in Kingston, Eufaula Dormitory in Eufaula, Jones Academy in Hartshorne, and Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah.

Nationally, there are 183 federally funded elementary and secondary schools, 53 bureau-run, and 130 tribal.

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Liberal arts college succeeds in China https://center-hostel.com/liberal-arts-college-succeeds-in-china/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 07:11:47 +0000 https://center-hostel.com/liberal-arts-college-succeeds-in-china/ As a new president takes charge of Peking University (PKU), its liberal arts college is arguably on the strongest footing since its inception. From humble beginnings in 2001 as a small experimental program within China’s leading institution, Yuanpei College is today, in many ways, a resounding success. It grew into a full-fledged liberal arts college […]]]>

As a new president takes charge of Peking University (PKU), its liberal arts college is arguably on the strongest footing since its inception.

From humble beginnings in 2001 as a small experimental program within China’s leading institution, Yuanpei College is today, in many ways, a resounding success. It grew into a full-fledged liberal arts college with over 1,200 students, attracting the crème de la crème of applicants to its parent institution.

“Yuanpei has become the most popular middle school in the PCU. Every year we have the best students from all over the country – PKU and Tsinghua have the best students, but we have the best of the best,” said Feiyu Sun, its associate dean.

But as the university enters a new era of leadership under Gong Qihuang, Yuanpei will once again have to show his worth. With competition ever stronger among Chinese graduates, convincing many people, even academics, of the value of its liberal arts education model continues to be an uphill battle.

“Over the past 20 years, most PKU presidents have come from science and technology backgrounds, so we had to ‘win’ our support from the administration. Some teachers understand that Yuanpei is important, but many don’t even today, even after 20 years,” Sun said.

In China, where students go through years of rigorous preparation for exams designed to place them in top universities to study narrowly defined professional fields, Yuanpei’s approach still seems radical. Students have the freedom to choose their courses here – with no basic requirements – and can graduate in three to six years instead of the standard four. They don’t even have to declare a major in their second year.

By design, the college does not have its own faculty, a decision that still sometimes puts it in tension with the entire PKU faculty, some of whom consider Yuanpei students to lack commitment to a discipline and compete for limited resources with students. within their own departments.

“It gave us a lot of challenges at first because students and teachers from other departments didn’t want Yuanpei students,” Sun said.

Since then, student performance in their classes has been a game-changer, convincing reluctant professors “that a student who chooses no major at first and could change majors without any restrictions could perform even better than students who study professional knowledge from the beginning,” Sun said.

He credited the drive of Yuanpei students, which stems from a genuine interest in the subjects they eventually settle on.

“In China, many students come to college to study economics or business because it was their parents’ decision. Students study this major but don’t like it,” he said. “If Yuanpei students choose a major, they choose it of their own accord… In Yuanpei, you really like this major.”

Getting to this stage, however, is not always easy. Unlike most college students, who choose a department and simply follow the curriculum, Yuanpei students have to choose their own courses, which is the hardest thing for them to do.

“Yuanpei students are really good, passionate, ambitious [and] know what they are doing, but some come to Yuanpei just because their studies were good in high school, not because they know what they want to pursue in college,” Sun said.

Like its students, the college itself is still finding its way.

When Yuanpei started as a program in 2001, there were no plans for what a Chinese liberal arts university would look like. Program directors could not “just borrow the Harvard model” or the old Chinese model, Sun noted.

“We had to find a new Chinese model, combine the tradition, the culture, the history of China [with] modern education… We had to use our imagination.

This remains Yuanpei’s biggest challenge even today, Sun said.

Recently, the college has focused on creating an environment in which students learn outside of the classroom. Taken for granted in countries with long-established liberal artistic traditions, the emphasis on socializing is still foreign in China, with students expected to bond and study during their university years, which the recently built residential college of Yuanpei seeks to resolve.

“We wanted to bring the students together to give them a public space so that they could meet, talk to each other, develop their many hobbies. We want to explore a college lifestyle in China. I believe very, very few professors in China are looking at this issue,” Sun said.

He is convinced that the liberal arts approach, whether in the classroom or in the dorm, pushes students to have “broader horizons”.

But for the more skeptical of his colleagues, any apparent benefit will have to translate into results for Yuanpei alumni. As a math professor recently told Sun, the only thing that will appeal to him are cold, hard numbers, numbers that won’t be apparent for years.

“If we want him to believe in Yuanpei’s model, we have to convince him by the number of students who study mathematics in Yuanpei and who, after 20 years, become famous scientists.”

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